My Article

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My Article

Post by Pufferfreak on April 3rd 2008, 5:17 pm

This article may not be redistributed in any way.
Here it is. Very Happy

http://www.thecowfishforum.com/Boxfish-in-the-Aquarium-h8.htm


Last edited by Pufferfreak on April 4th 2009, 3:15 pm; edited 1 time in total
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Re: My Article

Post by KIONG on April 13th 2008, 5:17 am

NICe man... pretty informative!! I'll work on my research on Ostraciidae too
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Re: My Article

Post by Pufferfreak on April 13th 2008, 9:58 pm

Thanks. We need more information.
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Re: My Article

Post by Pufferfreak on November 15th 2008, 10:49 pm

I moved it from the portal to the learn section of the forum. Smile

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Re: My Article

Post by ~ocean on August 19th 2009, 2:04 pm

cool man, i'll post an essay about boxfish and cowfish, as much as i can find that i've written in the past below k?

~ocean
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Re: My Article

Post by ~ocean on August 19th 2009, 2:04 pm

Camel Cowfish

In the widths of the ocean, and the frags of coral reefs, a small tang swam, plucking the coral for food. But unaware the tang was, when a small fish darted out. It was the camel cowfish. Using its small teeth, the cowfish allegedly ripped out a chunk of the tang’s meat, leaving a small crater there. The tang swam in fury away, but the cowfish returned, and again… and again, until the tang was no more but a scavenger’s meal.

The camel cowfish is a little omnivore, though its passion for meat is greater than for veggies. This little fish likes to eat inverts and regularly puffs on the sand to expose stray invertebrates.

Below is content about its natural habitat, its physical and mental characteristics, human inter-relationships, and evolution.

The camel cowfish lives in the Indo-Pacific range, though it does sometimes, make short appearances in the Atlantic. This type of cowfish swims around most of the time, picking at inverts and small fish. Other times, it rests in coral cracks, or lies in a secure place like a cave or in small used caves. This species makes their homes lower to the seabed because part of their main diet is invertebrates. If predators do attack these fish, they hustle back as quick as they can to their homes, and if not possible, as a last resort thing, they release a poison known as ostratoxin. This poison kills all round it, excluding various hardy species of invertebrates, coral, and perhaps a stray human diver. Young fry of this species cannot release this poison because they have not yet consumed poisonous algae which cowfish and boxfish eat to release this poison.

The camel cowfish, alternately known as the humpback turretfish, has an odd pyramid shape like a camel hump or like a “humpback”, thus giving it these odd names. Other than that, this cowfish is yellow, and has blue pupils with white eye-whites. The cowfish’s eye is one of its main keys to success. It is like a small motion sensor, detecting most of scenery around it. Its mouth is a developed cone like shape, evolved for precision targeting against its prey. This mouth also developed invertebrate crushing teeth, which is “indestructible” in some means. This species have see through fins, which flap so quickly, that little is seen.

Camel Cowfish have to be cunning and smart to survive in the unforgiving ocean. And that’s what they’ve developed to do. Outwitting predator and prey, this species isn’t only tough on the outside. Camel cowfish have developed a very advanced brain, somewhat like the brain of a human. The eye vein of the cowfish links directly to the brain, which is an advantage because this means that what the cowfish sees can be seen in the brain a few nanoseconds quicker than most fish, giving a huge advantage. This may not seem like long, but it is the matter of life and death, and every split nanosecond counts.

The camel cowfish is used in the aquaria trade, but is somewhat rare. Camel cowfish must be delicately caught and shipped to fish stores across the world, so travel is already quite hard on the poor fellows. Then, they’d have to wait until purchased, and already they will be tired. They aren’t the hardiest species and will release their toxins at will.

~ocean
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Re: My Article

Post by ~ocean on August 19th 2009, 2:05 pm

Scribbled Boxfish (Ostracion Solorensis)

As the doomed fish swam closer and closer a surprise was going to happen sooner and sooner… then in a flash, a scribbled boxfish popped out of small hidden cave in the widths of coral and wriggled for control as it bit its prey with a iron grip, then retreated to the shadows of the cave for a good meal once in it’s tight grip.

Scribbled boxfish are a wonderful type of fish, smart, charming and deadly when attacking like the one described above catching its prey. They have a base of a secret toxin, which it gets from eating poisonous algae. They have a distinctive box-like shape, which gives it the name boxfish, and the same concept applies to the rest of the boxfish species with the exception of the sub species of cowfish.

Following will be content about the boxfish’s habitat, physical and mental characteristics, it’s inter-relationship with humans and its evolution, which will all be thoroughly elaborated about.

This type of boxfish live in a tropical climate and in the world, you may only find these boxfish naturally in Australia or in aquariums. They like particular spots where it can float around and rest without worrying about predators like coral reefs or small stone caves where it will make a temporary home. If caught by predators, it will release a deadly toxin, which will kill all living things around it (with a few exceptions like human divers, some invertebrates or very large animals excluding the predator). However, it cannot release this toxin if it has not eaten this certain poisonous algae. They can blow jets of water at sand on the seafloor to exploit invertebrates that it enjoys munching on. Not only do they like eating inverts, they will also feast on small clams and other shelled animals and obviously, fish. One of their favorite types of prey is shrimp. They especially love gut-loaded brine shrimp and glass shrimp, for they are small, nutritious and somewhat fun for them to catch and devour. In the aquaria, they can be hand fed and are very gentile at touch.

This type of boxfish is named scribbled for a reason. It’s because they’re body pattern are like scribbles with some random spots there and there. In color and they’re gray and have scribble stripes and spots which are shades of gray for females, and blue or gray or a bit of both with scribbles and stripes for males. This specific species of boxfish grow only 5 inches in size (12 cm) and are the smallest of their family. They have scales covered with waterproof oil-substance, which also can release toxins. They have intelligent looking eyes, which are like minuscule motion sensors, knowing if predators will come or not, which are striped as well. Their eyes are highly developed and can even see in mostly black places. Their developed mouths are perfect for hard-shelled, soft objects, or fishtail-like substances. Their overall body is like a gray scribbled on and spotted smooth box with rounded corners, fins, and a mouth and with fast moving striped eyes. They have transparent fins which wave around a lot, though not too visible.

The scribbled boxfish’s mental skills are amazing. They have a very advanced brain, which has a brain to body mass ratio higher than humans (not saying the are exactly smarter than humans although some could be) and they have skills that are almost unrealistic. They have inner organs that allow them to mentally release their famed poison toxins at order. The same part of the brain takes care of squirting jets of water out of their mouths. They have a brilliant set of eyes, which can transport what they see into their brain at a high rate.

Scribbled boxfish are rare in the aquaria trade because of uncommon shippers. They need at least a 25-gallon aquarium to live an adequate life. They are the in the list of the most popular fish – the boxfish and cowfish, because of their “cute” looks and personality. When hungry, all types of boxfish and cowfish beg by spitting water. Though cute, it could cause buoyancy problems and eventually could become death.

Scribbled boxfish love to eat in aquariums. They can have a good attitude and just eat the feeder foods (occasionally a stray cleaner shrimp that you if you would have one in your aquarium), or they can have a nasty attitude and devour anything and everything that it sees (except for its owner, some types of coral and/or plants and objects outside the aquaria. Anyhow, they’re passionable and affectionate fish with a sort of personality you don’t see everyday (unless you own one) For those who already have a scribbled boxfish, hands should be clean with not a strong scent of soap or detergents when handfeeding.

All parts of their body are deadly and any digestion will lead to poisoning and if medication is not given, the consumer (except those predators who are able to consume poison and not die) will die in a few days. Their poison is limited and for that reason it needs to eat more algae of a specific type. In the aquaria, if you do not want it having such powers to “nuke” your aquarium, don’t encourage algae eating and try to clean your aquarium of algae totally with some commercial products or with hand/other animals.

The scribbled boxfish started down the path of evolution in the early Silurian seas with their 1 cm fish ancestors with the first backbone ever. Following in the Cambrian era, were the armored headed fish called Celophaisis, which had the blueprint for everything living today. When this came into the late Cambrian era, the boxfish had the ancestor, which was a two ton 7 meter monster fish that dominated the seas named Hyneria. Soon enough, their ancestors shrank and grew in size, developing an odd box shape and feasting on deadly poisonous algae, which has more poison than poison in lionfish allowing it to also have poison itself. And still, it will continue to scribble its way down the path of evolution.

~ocean
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Re: My Article

Post by ~ocean on August 19th 2009, 2:06 pm

about puffer below
Valentini Toby Pufferfish (Canthigaster valentini )

The fish swimming were ignorant of something lurking in the shadows… With lightning speed, the fish scattered at the sight of a valentini puffer. The puffer used its velocity to snatch one of the fish and swim back to its lair to feast.

Above was a description of a valentini puffer attacking a shoal of fish. The a puffer can grow around 4.5 inches in size and have an ability to puff up 2 times its average size by swallowing water and oxygen. It has a high ratio of brain mass to body mass, which is even more than most humans!

In the following areas of interest, I will elaborate about its habitat, physical and mental characteristics, along with human inter-relationships and its evolution.

The valentini puffer lives in the tropics in the Indo-pacific. It lives in the open ocean current, though frequently stopping by at any small caves or shady places to rest and dig for invertebrates for consumption. It enjoys the crispy taste of invertebrates, though at the same time, it needs them to wear down their ever-growing teeth. As well, it loves eating. The puffers do enjoy preying on small shoals of small fish. When predators are spotted, or when it feels threatened, it puffs up becoming twice its normal size.

Valentini puffers can grow from 4.5 inches to 5 inches in size, and become over 9 inches when it puffs up. The puffers have a scaly texture, also a bit oily to make it less easy for predators to get a grip on, and for making it more waterproof. This species of puffers have dark brownish eyes and males have some green coloration under their eyes. Because of their big appetite, they are somewhat “chubby” which gives them a more appealing appearance.

These puffers have a high IQ for their size. They have a brain to weight ratio even greater than most humans. Their eyesight is a good advantage. Though not the most complex in the world, they have a unique and sharp eyesight and taste. They have a dog like personality seen mostly in aquaria. Their acute sense of smell enables it to smell predators from far away, giving it time to inflate so it is ready and protected.

Humans have a history of eating. They’ve tried eating crazy stuff and one of them is Pufferfish. Although, not the valentini puffer, other puffers are consumed mostly in Japan for their sushi use.

Valentini puffers are something to boost about for an aquaria. They love to eat and swim around and nipping other fish’s fins. They easily dispose you’re shrimp and crabs into it’s stomach. Other than that, they are affectionate, kind, loving, and described “like a dog in the fish world.” They can recognize their owner’s face and have a long-term memory. If not spoiled, these fish can become bold and even beg for food like a dog begging for table scraps. They can squirt water from their mouths when begging, although it is cute, it could possibly cause air to get stuck in their lungs and when they try to breath underwater, they will drown. As well, petting is not recommended, for it can take of a layer of oily substance, which allows them to be more waterproof.

Evolution of this species is in the same line as evolution for toby puffers, and puffers. Form the early Silurian era there were their tiny 1 cm backbone fish ancestors. Following in the Cambrian era, were the armored headed fish called Celophaisis, which had the blueprint for everything living today. When this came into the late Cambrian era, the puffers had the ancestor, which was called Hyneria, a two ton 7 meter monster fish that dominated the seas. Slowly, though time, the ancestors of puffers developed spikes, and soon, a way to inflate themselves, until finally, it came to the current day puffers. And from here, who knows what they’ll become in the future as they float down the line of evolution.

~ocean
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Re: My Article

Post by Pufferfreak on August 30th 2010, 11:11 pm

Nice articles Matt.

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